Dating divorced people in singapore

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At present, it is significantly below this, being 1.20 in 2011 and 1.29 in 2012 (a five-year high regarded as a blip because 2012 was a Dragon year in the Chinese zodiac).

Marriage rates are falling too, with decreases in the number of people between 15 – 44 who are married, and an increase in the median age of new brides in 2013 (27.4 years) and grooms (29.9 years) .

In both sexes, therefore, there is a mixture of both liberal, modern attitudes and social conservatism regarding gender roles and relationships, with individuals themselves often holding conflicting views simultaneously What this uncertainty means is that the business of dating in Singapore is much like that of western countries, in that Singaporean women expect men to do ‘romantic’ things, such as give them gifts, take them for fancy dinners on special occasions, buy them flowers and so on.

Most Singaporean men, likewise, are content with this dynamic, although perhaps less enamoured of the expenditure involved!

This is why the authorities play such an active role in encouraging marriage and promoting procreation.

Young Singaporeans, raised on ideas of high achievement, material wealth and upward mobility set criteria that their prospective partner needs to meet, yet increasingly it is thought that they simply set the bar too high, creating unrealistic standards that very few people could attain.

Additionally, despite the fact that marriage rates are falling and people are getting married later, there is nevertheless a prevailing sense that marriage is the ‘normal’ state of affairs and that people who don’t marry have missed an important part of life, and although there is no open discrimination against unmarried people, anecdotally there is often the sense that those who don’t marry are atypical, and perhaps out of mainstream life.

This is one of the many paradoxes around dating and marriage—most Singaporeans hold the view that marriage is the state to which all should aspire, and yet growing numbers remain unmarried.

The reasons for this are frequently debated, but for many the pressure on Singaporeans to succeed professionally and financially are often seen as the root cause, as young professionals wait until they’ve established their careers before they start to think about a family.

However, authorities are concerned that far too many of them are leaving it far too late.

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